Crucial re-packaging of Nurse With Wounds debut album from 1979 –
“Chance Meeting on a Dissecting Table of a Sewing Machine and an Umbrella”

Packed with a hefty amount of DIY appliance, this tape contains a copy of the original ‘Nurse With Wound List’, a list of several dozen artists, from avant-garde to krautrock to musique concrete to psychedelic music that influenced the making of this album and their work in general.

To put it short, this is a fierce representation of true, early avant-garde industrial music…
This story (snatched from wiki) about how the album came together is a the perfect approval of this raw sentiment of honest experimentation in order to forge new clearings and forward movement in art:

“The album came about when Steven Stapleton was working as a signwriter in London in 1978. Completing a job at an independent recording studio, he engaged in conversation with the studio’s engineer, Nick Rogers. Rogers, frustrated with the advertising and voice-over work the studio brought in, expressed a wish to work with more experimental bands. Stapleton informed Rogers that he was in such a band and a studio date was arranged. Stapleton, however, was lying and had to hurriedly put something together. He called his friends John Fothergill and Heman Pathak, telling them to get hold of an instrument of some sort. Thus, the first line-up of Nurse With Wound (whose name supposedly relates to a scene in the film Battleship Potemkin) was quickly assembled, Stapleton on percussion, Fothergill on guitar (with built-in ring modulator) and Pathak on organ. The trio didn’t have a chance to rehearse before entering the studio, yet the album was completed within 6 hours, with Rogers adding what was called “commercial guitar” on the sleeve. The studio’s piano and synthesizer were also used. The tale is so fortuitous as to appear unlikely but Stapleton and Fothergill agreed on the story when interviewed separately by David Keenan for his book England’s Hidden Reverse.

The album contains 3 lengthy tracks and Stapleton has stated that these were edited from improvisations with some overdubbing. Stapleton designed the sleeve using an old pornographic magazine. Some copies came in a brown paper bag as a handful of stores were not prepared to have the cover on display; however, both Rough Trade and Virgin took copies without censorship. The original hand-numbered 500 copy pressing was cleared within weeks. Amongst those who bought the album were Tim Gane, later of Stereolab, and William Bennett of Whitehouse, both of whom would later work with Stapleton.

One of the most discussed aspects of the album however was the inclusion of the Nurse with Wound list, an A4 sheet with a list of bands and artist who had provided inspiration to the group. It remains a touchstone for collectors of experimental and outsider music. The 2001 reissue of the album contains the bonus track “Strain, Crack, Break”, which consists of a heavily cut-up recording of David Tibet reading the list.”

A proper artefact, this reissue from our Post Materialization Music in Russia comes housed in a zip lock bag with pink / green screenprinted sleeve, screenprinted NURSE WITH WOUND patch (that one is a fave here) and individually stickered cassettes housing these ferocious sounds from four decades ago.

Edition of 150, sold out at source – we got the last three of them.

More from the Post Materialization Music label...
Have you checked out these? Here are some more underground items...