Serious milestone, foundation business from the hills of Jamaica – Nyabinghi Rasta music at its finest, delivered with cool ease, and deadly determination all at once… Released in 1973, a year before another great spiritual classic by ‘Dadawah’ – this was surely an inspiration, and it stands even taller, and prouder along side it.

Completely essential business for anyone who considers themselves to be a roots-head, anyone tuned in to the power of post-slavery black music such as Jazz, Blues, Reggae, and the music that followed in its footsteps.

Here it is, reissued in a mighty beautiful three disc gatefold package, lovingly pressed to vinyl with full dynamics, and re-mastered via Japan’s Dub Store Records – seriously, this one is precious.

Read on:

An unimpeachable classic considered to be the pinnacle of Rastafarian inspired music
Master drummer Count Ossie’s band, including the incomparable tenor saxophonist Cedric ‘I’m’ Brooks, recreate a Rasta grounation, or gathering, playing and chanting a sublime supplication, including Bible readings, in praise of Emperor Haile Selassie I

The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari plays a music that is immediately identifiable to their life-style. It is a music of controlled anger, due to the yoke of slavery which is now being broken from the backs of the musicians and the people of their environment. It is a music of laughter due to the inherent humour of the originators and the people of their environment. It is a music of love that is natural to the creators and the people of their environment.

“Through love man can see the light, the light is understanding, and understanding will make mankind move on for life” Brother Samuel Clayton

The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari is a fusion of the Mystics, led by Cedric “Im” Brooks and the Count Ossie Rastafarian Drummers. These two groups in the past were responsible for some of the most colourful and creative music that has emerged from this island of Jamaica. The horns and bass of the Mystics met and understood the drums of the Count Ossie drummers at the African Cultural Centre in the autumn of 1970. A few months later they were together and have remained so through these tough and trying days…

Utterly crucial in any collection.

Three disc gatefold, in beautiful sleeve art, with the original art, in a re-rub with sleeve notes and infos. Gold pieces, no doubt.

TRACKLIST:
A1 Bongo Man 4:50
A2 Narration 9:00
B1 Narration Continued 4:50
B2 Mabrat (Passin Thru) 3:15
B3 Poem 2:45
B4 Four Hundred Years 4:35
C1 Poem 1:10
C2 Song 1:55
C3 Lumba 7:15
C4 Way Back Home 4:35
D1 Ethiopian Serenade 4:10
D2 Oh Carolina 3:36
D3 So Long 4:52
E1 Grounation 15:07
F1 Grounation Cont’d 15:07

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